The Amateur Gourmet
: December 2012 0

The first salt that I tried was perhaps the most shocking: Kala Namak from India. The flavor is immediately intense–reminiscent of Indian food or cumin–and I’ll admit, I thought it was some kind of spice blend when I first tried it. But reading about it online, I discovered that the aroma occurs naturally because of its sulfur content. Wikipedia likens it to “rotten eggs” which isn’t particularly appealing; I’d liken it more to how cumin smells a little bit like body odor? But in a good sort of way?

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Specialty Food Magazine
: November 2012 0

“In a time of ingredient-driven cuisine, people are looking for quality ingredients that make their dishes pop. They are turning to artisan salts, rediscovering something authentic and real that has been overlooked for years,” says selmelier Mark Bitterman, author of Salted, A Manifesto on the World’s Most Essential Mineral and owner of The Meadow, a specialty shop of salts, chocolates, flowers and bitters with locations in Portland, Ore., and New York. “The resurgence of artisan salts is no longer subtle; it is becoming mind-blowing.”

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Mix Magazine: 
September 2012 0

I went to The Meadow in search of the perfect salt for eggs. A clerk handed me a black salt from India called kala namak. I opened the jar and inhaled a whiff of sulfur. I bought it on faith, used it on scrambled eggs the next day, and retired my regular salt shaker, overcome by the urge to sprinkle kala namak on everything. Tofu? Check. Vegetables — yes, especially sauteed padron peppers, which seem to have been made for it. In India, kala namak is used in fruit chaat, a fruit salad sold on street corners. Salt is an inexpensive indulgence — at least kala namak is. Buy a small bottle and see what foods you can subtly transform.

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Rowler's Whiskey Forge
: September 2012 0

Writer Matthew Rowley discovers our bitters tasting table at the New York store: “The Meado’s way around shoppers’ potential unfamiliarity with brands is to offer a tasting table where one bottle of every bitters in stock is open. Drinkers who want to compare brands of celery, old fashioned, orange, or other bitters are welcome to do so.”

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